Insert Blanc Press

 

The People: Boris Dralyuk & Andrew Falkowski Ep. 4
Sunday, June 16 at 3 p.m.
KCHUNG 1630AM Listen Live

Join hosts Ben White and Mathew Timmons Sunday June 16 at 3 p.m. on KCHUNG 1630AM if you're in or around Chinatown Los Angeles or listen live on the KCHUNG webstream. The People will include guests Boris Dralyuk & Andrew Falkowski in conversation about their recent projects and their forthcoming work with Insert Blanc Press. 
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Boris Dralyuk holds a PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures from UCLA. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the Times Literary Supplement, The New Yorker, World Literature Today, Poetry International, Slavic and East European Journal, Russian History, and other journals. He is the translator of Leo Tolstoy’s How Much Land Does a Man Need (Calypso Editions, 2010), co-translator of Polina Barskova’s The Zoo in Winter: Selected Poems (Melville House, 2011), and author of the monograph Western Crime Fiction Goes East: The Russian Pinkerton Craze 1907-1934 (Brill, 2012). He is also the co-editor, with Robert Chandler and Irina Mashinski, of the forthcoming Anthology of Russian Poetry from Pushkin to Brodsky (Penguin Classics, 2015). He received First Prize in the 2011 Compass Translation Award competition, and, with Irina Mashinski, First Prize in the 2012 Joseph Brodsky/Stephen Spender Translation Prize competition.

 

A SLAP IN THE FACE
FOUR RUSSIAN FUTURIST MANIFESTOS 
Translated from the Russian by Boris Dralyuk

 

The first of the Manifestoh! series curated by editor David Shook.
Containing 
A SLAP IN THE FACE OF PUBLIC TASTE (1912) 
the manifesto from A TRAP FOR JUDGES II (1913) 
GO TO HELL! (1914) 
A DROP OF TAR (1915)
“The emergence of the New poetries has affected the still-creeping old fogies of Russian little-ature like white-marbled Pushkin dancing the tango.”
The four manifestos collected in A SLAP IN THE FACE rattle with the verbal ingenuity and vitriolic verve of Russia’s most accomplished Futurist collective—known as Hylaea and, for a brief period, the Cubo-Futurists. Organized in 1910-11 by the Burlyuk brothers, the group featured the wildly talented poets Velimir Khlebnikov and Vladimir Mayakovsky, as well as the master of “transrational” (“zaum”) poetics, Aleksey Kruchenykh. The Hylaean program of total destruction and uncertain renewal offers an ominous parallel to the political turmoil of the Great War and the events of 1917. Dralyuk’s annotations provide information on Hylaea’s tumultuous history, its literary battles and short-lived alliances, and the biographies of its members.
Andrew Falkowski is a part-time instructor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a lecturer at Northwestern University. He received a BA from the University of California, Santa Cruz; an MA at the University of Wisconsin, Madison; and an MFA from CalArts. He is represented by Andrew Rafacz Gallery and Rosamund Felsen Gallery where he currently has an exhibition, On to the Next One, from June 8 to July 6, 2013. He joined the Artist Pension Trust (NYC) in 2006. He has had solo shows at Rosamund Felsen Gallery and Andrew Rafacz Gallery; and group shows throughout the U.S., including exhibitions at Kavi Gupta Gallery and the Suburban Gallery in Chicago, and the St. Louis Contemporary Museum in St. Louis, MO. Aside from writing for New Art Examiner and Cakewalk Magazine from 1999-2003, Falkowski has been reviewed or featured in New City, THE magazine, Artweek and Swindle Quarterly. He currently lives and works in Chicago.

Written by Mathew Timmons — June 16, 2013